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#4207
Ed Lantz
Participant

<p>Karen, glad you found my comments on entropy useful.  Thermodynamics can be confusing but it does boil down to some very basic concepts. The term entropy is also used in information theory. Interestingly, the more random a signal appears, the more information is potentially contained in that signal. So when we probe quantum information and see pure randomness, we could in fact be seeing the superposition of a vast amount of information from all corners of the universe.</p><p> </p><p>Duane, regarding the computer/brain – software/consciousness analogy – agreed – you don’t want to push that metaphor too far.  The distinction that I’m trying to make here is that consciousness is not mechanical or even electrical in nature, it is informational in nature, and can only be understood by looking at informational structures. Just as we cannot fully understand a computer by probing voltages on the motherboard, the mind cannot be fully understood by probing voltages in neurons. But the truth is that we’re not very good at probing neurons yet, much less quantum correlations.</p><p> </p><p>We do not yet understand neural coding – the neuronal language of our brains – because we have no means of imaging in detail the spatial distribution of neuronal activity in the brain. We can image blood flow down to several millimeter accuracy with fMRI imaging which is suggestive of bulk neuronal activity. And we can implant multielectrode arrays that image a small patch of neural tissue. But we cannot image bulk neural “action potentials” (voltages from firing neurons) over large areas of the brain with single-neuron spatial accuracy. And we’ve hardly begun to look at quantum informational activity in the brain. </p><p> </p><p>When we are able to image the informational activity of consciousness, whether it ends up being neuronal, quantum informational or whatever, I’m sure it will be infinitely more complex than computer programs. </p>